Attention WICR Piece Rate Workers, Know Your Rights On Compensation – Former Employees May Be Eligible For Back Wages Too! Atención, trabajadores a destajo de WICR, conozca sus derechos sobre la compensación – Los ex empleados también pueden ser elegibles para salarios atrasados!

All translation to Spanish was done by Google Translate, not Jose Ortiz!

Lea esto en español, desplácese hacia abajo

Click here to go to the Department of Industrial Relations website, download complaint forms, learn about your rights. Efren Contreras won back over $4500.00 in back wages WICR attempted to steal from him. Haga clic aquí para ir al sitio web del Departamento de Relaciones Industriales, descargar formularios de quejas y conocer sus derechos. Efren Contreras recuperó más de $ 4500.00 en salarios atrasados que WICR intentó robarle. https://www.dir.ca.gov/pieceratebackpayelection/AB_1513_FAQs.htm

If you work for WICR and are paid piece rate, read this article from the Department of Industrial Relations. If you previously worked for WICR on or after July 15, 2012, you may be eligible for back pay as well. Si trabaja para WICR y le pagan a destajo, lea este artículo del Departamento de Relaciones Industriales. Si trabajó anteriormente para WICR el 15 de julio de 2012 o después, es posible que también sea elegible para recibir pagos atrasados.

Department of Industrial Relations protects all workers, regardless of immigration status. El Departamento de Relaciones Industriales protege a todos los trabajadores, independientemente de su estado migratorio.

Piece-Rate Compensation – Labor Code §226.2 (AB 1513)

General Information

Q. When does the law go into effect?

A. By operation of law, AB 1513 went into effect on January 1, 2016.

Q. What does AB 1513 do?

A. AB 1513 adds section 226.2 to the California Labor Code, which applies “for employees who are compensated on a piece-rate basis for any work performed during a pay period.”

In general terms, Labor Code section 226.2 does two things:

  1. It establishes compensation and wage statement requirements for rest and recovery periods and “other nonproductive time” for piece-rate employees going forward from the effective date of the statute.
  2. It establishes, for certain employers and under certain circumstances, an “affirmative defense” to any claim or cause of action for damages or statutory penalties based on an employer’s alleged failure to pay compensation due for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time for time periods prior to the effective date of the statute.

Q. What is piece-rate compensation?

A. Labor Code section 226.2 does not change the existing definition of what constitutes “piece-rate” compensation.

The existing Division of Labor Standards Enforcement Manual contains the following explanation of piece-rate compensation:

2.5.1 Piece-Rate or “Piece Work”

The American Heritage Dictionary defines the term piece-rate as: “Work paid for according to the number of units turned out.” Consequently, a piece-rate must be based upon an ascertainable figure paid for completing a particular task or making a particular piece of goods.

Q. Does this statute change overtime compensation requirements?

A. Labor Code section 226.2 expressly states in the opening paragraph that it “shall not be construed to limit or alter minimum wage or overtime compensation requirements, or the obligation to compensate employees for all hours worked under any other statute or local ordinance.”

This means that in any workweek in which a piece-rate employee worked overtime hours, overtime compensation must be calculated and paid according to existing law.

Back to top

Piece-Rate compensation and wage statement requirements effective January 1, 2016 and later

Q. What are the compensation requirements for rest and recovery periods for piece-rate employees?

A. Labor Code section 226.2, subdivision (a), paragraphs (1) and (3) provide that:

  • Employees must be compensated for rest and recovery periods separate from any piece-rate compensation, and
  • The rate of compensation for rest and recovery periods shall be the higher of:
    • An average hourly rate determined by dividing the total compensation for the workweek, exclusive of compensation for rest and recovery periods and any premium compensation for overtime, by the total hours worked during the workweek, exclusive of rest and recovery periods.
    • The applicable minimum wage.

This means that piece-rate employees must be paid compensation for rest and recovery periods that is separatefrom their piece-rate compensation. An employer may not treat the piece-rate compensation as including compensation for rest and recovery periods, no matter how the piece-rate was determined.

The hourly rate of compensation for rest and recovery periods must be the same as the hourly rate (averaged over the workweek) that an employee earned during the workweek for time during which he or she was performing work. If, for some reason, this average hourly rate comes out to less than minimum wage, then the employee must be paid at minimum wage.

Q. How does an employer determine the average hourly rate to be paid for rest and recovery periods?

A. The formula for determining the average hourly rate to be paid for rest and recovery periods is set forth in the statute, as follows:

Divide the total compensation for the workweek, exclusive of compensation for rest and recovery periods and any premium compensation for overtime, by the total hours worked during the workweek, exclusive of rest and recovery periods.”

(Labor Code §226.2(a)(3)(i).)

The following are some examples of application of this formula.

Examples:

1. For a workweek of piece-rate compensation only:

  • A piece-rate employee works a 5-day, 40-hour workweek.
  • The employee has two 10-minute rest periods authorized and permitted per day, for a total of 100 minutes (1.67 hours) of rest periods for the workweek.
  • The employee earns $500 in piece-rate compensation for the workweek.
The average hourly rate to be paid for the rest periods for this employee is calculated as follows:
$500Total compensation not including compensation for the rest periods
÷38.33Total hours less rest periods
=$13.04/hr
x 1.67 hrs
Rest periods for the workweek
=$21.78Compensation for rest periods for the workweek
Total compensation for the workweek:
$500Piece-rate compensation
+$21.78Compensation for rest periods
=$521.78

2. For a workweek of piece-rate compensation and a base rate of minimum wage for all hours worked:

  • An employee works a 5-day, 40-hour workweek.
  • The employee has two 10-minute rest periods authorized and permitted per day, for a total of 100 minutes (1.67 hours) of rest periods for the workweek.
  • The employee is paid minimum wage ($10/hour) for all hours worked, including the two 10-minute rest periods, for a total of $400.
  • The employee also earns a total of $300 in piece-rate compensation for the workweek.

2. For a workweek of piece-rate compensation and a base rate of minimum wage for all hours worked:

  • An employee works a 5-day, 40-hour workweek.
  • The employee has two 10-minute rest periods authorized and permitted per day, for a total of 100 minutes (1.67 hours) of rest periods for the workweek.
  • The employee is paid minimum wage ($10/hour) for all hours worked, including the two 10-minute rest periods, for a total of $400.
  • The employee also earns a total of $300 in piece-rate compensation for the workweek.
The average hourly rate to be paid for the rest periods for this employee is calculated as follows:
$683.30Total compensation for the workweek, not including compensation for rest and recovery periods, which is the $300 in piece-rate compensation, plus the minimum wage paid for all hours worked except the 1.67 hours of rest period time
÷38.33Total hours less rest periods
=$17.83/hourNote: $10/hour of this time is already calculated into and paid in the employee’s minimum wage of $10/hour for all hours worked, including the rest period time.Therefore, the additional amount owed for rest periods under this example is $7.83/hour.
Total compensation for the workweek:
$400Minimum wages for all hours worked, including the rest period time
+$300Piece-rate compensation
+$7.83 x 1.67 hours = $13.08Additional amount over minimum wage required to pay correct average hourly rate for rest periods
=$713.08 

3. For a workweek with both piece-rate work and hourly work:

  • An employee works a 5-day, 40-hour workweek.
  • On two 8-hour days of this workweek (for a total of 16 hours), the employee works at an hourly rate of $10/hour, and does no piece-rate work.
  • On the other three days of the week (for a total of 24 hours), the employee does piece-rate work only and earns a total of $300 in piece-rate compensation.
  • On each day of the workweek, the employee has two 10-minute rest periods authorized and permitted, for a total of 100 minutes (1.67 hours) of rest periods for the workweek.
  • On the two hourly-work days, these rest periods are compensated at the $10 hourly wage.
The average hourly rate to be paid for the rest periods for this employee is calculated as follows:
$453.30Total compensation for the workweek, not including compensation for rest and recovery periods, which is the $300 in piece-rate compensation, plus the $160 for hourly work, less $6.70, which is the compensation for the 40 minutes of rest and recovery periods on the two hourly-rate days.
÷38.33Total hours, which is 40 hours less the 1.67 hours of rest period time
=$11.83/hourNote: For the days on which the employee worked at an hourly rate, $10/hour of this time is already been paid as part of the hourly rate. For those two days, the employee is owed only an additional $1.83/hour for the rest periods. For the days on which the employee did piece-rate work, the rate to be paid for the rest periods is $11.83.
Total compensation for the workweek:
$160For the hourly rate worked on two days
+$300Piece-rate compensation
+$1.83 x .67 hours = $1.23The additional amount owed for the rest periods on the hourly rate days to bring them to the average hourly rate for the workweek.
+$11.83 x 1.0 hourFor the rest periods on the piece-rate days
=$473.06

4. For a workweek of piece-rate compensation and overtime hours:

  • An employee works a 6-day, 47-hour workweek, for which 7 hours constitute overtime.
  • The employee has two 10-minute rest periods authorized and permitted per day, for a total of 120 minutes (2.0 hours) of rest periods for the workweek.
  • The employee earns a total of $800 in piece-rate compensation for the workweek.
The average hourly rate to be paid for the rest periods for this employee is calculated as follows:
$800Total compensation for the workweek, not including compensation for the rest and recovery periods or premium pay for overtime.
÷45 hoursTotal hours, not including the rest and recovery periods.
=$17.78/hourx 2.0 hours= $35.56Compensation for rest and recovery periods for this workweek.
The overtime premium compensation for this employee is:
$800Piece-rate compensation
+$35.56Compensation for rest and recovery periods
=$835.56
÷47 hours
=17.78/hourRegular rate of pay
x.5
=$8.89Premium pay due for overtime hours
x7 hoursOvertime hours
=$62.23
Total compensation for the workweek:
$800Piece-rate compensation
+$35.56Compensation for rest and recovery periods
+$62.23Premium pay for overtime hours
=$897.79

Q. If an employer pays a base hourly rate for all hours worked (for example, minimum wage), but also pays additional piece-rate compensation, is it sufficient for the employer to just pay minimum wage for the employee’s rest breaks?

A. No. Going forward, the statute requires compensation at an average hourly rate determined by dividing total compensation by the total hours worked in the workweek, as explained above. This encourages employees to take their authorized rest breaks, without feeling that doing so will decrease their compensation.

Q. What types of compensation must be included in determining the average hourly rate to be paid for rest and recovery periods?

A. The statute says that the average hourly rate shall be “determined by dividing the total compensation for the workweek, exclusive of compensation for rest and recovery periods and any premium compensation for overtime, by the total hours worked during the workweek, exclusive of rest and recovery periods.”

As indicated above, the statute refers to “total compensation” for the workweek. This type of formula is similar to the manner in which employers are currently required to calculate a regular rate of pay for overtime compensation purposes. The Division of Labor Standards Enforcement Manual contains information on the types of compensation within a workweek that generally must be included for this purpose and those that are not. (See DLSE Manual, §49.1 to 49.1.2.3 (items to be included) and §49.1.2.4 (types of compensation not included.)

Q. What are “rest and recovery periods”, as referred to in the statute?

A. Labor Code section 226.2 does not change the definition for rest and recovery periods. Those terms have the same meaning as they do under existing law.

“Rest” periods are defined and required under a number of existing wage orders. For example, existing Wage Order 1 (Manufacturing Industry) contains the following provision regarding rest periods:

12. Rest Periods

A. Every employer shall authorize and permit all employees to take rest periods, which insofar as practicable shall be in the middle of each work period. The authorized rest period time shall be based on the total hours worked daily at the rate of ten (10) minutes net rest time per four (4) hours or major fraction thereof. However, a rest period need not be authorized for employees whose total daily work time is less than three and one-half (3 1/2) hours. Authorized rest period time shall be counted as hours worked for which there shall be no deduction from wages.

B. If an employer fails to provide an employee a rest period in accordance with the applicable provisions of this order, the employer shall pay the employee one (1) hour of pay at the employee’s regular rate of compensation for each work day that the rest period is not provided.

(Wage Order 1, ¶128 CCR section 11010.)

Most of the existing wage orders contain similar, or identical, provisions on rest periods.

Existing Labor Code section 226.7 defines a “recovery period” as “a cooldown period afforded an employee to prevent heat illness.”

Labor Code section 226.7 also provides that:

(b)   An employer shall not require an employee to work during a meal or rest or recovery period mandated pursuant to an applicable statute, or applicable regulation, standard, or order of the Industrial Welfare Commission, the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board, or the Division of Occupational Safety and Health.

In Brinker Restaurant Corp. v. Superior Court (2012) 53 Cal.4th 1004, 1029, the California Supreme Court said the following concerning rest periods (applying Wage Order 5):

Employees are entitled to 10 minutes rest for shifts from three and one-half to six hours in length, 20 minutes for shifts of more than six hours up to 10 hours, 30 minutes for shifts of more than 10 hours up to 14 hours, and so on.

(Id. at 1029.) See also Brinker, supra, 53 Cal.4th at 1033 (“An employer is required to authorize and permit the amount of rest break time called for under the wage order for its industry.”)

Q. Does Labor Code section 226.2 mean that employers will need to track the number of minutes that employees actually take for their rest and recovery periods?

A. No. Section 226.2, subdivision (a)(2) requires that an employee’s itemized wage statement state “[t]he total hours of compensable rest and recovery periods, the rate of compensation, and the gross wages paid for those periods during the pay period.” (Emphasis added.)

If an employer has authorized and permitted two 10-minute rest periods during an employee’s work shift (see quote from Brinker above), the “compensable” rest and recovery periods are those that have been authorized and permitted according to existing law. That is the amount of time for which an employee must be compensated (i.e., the “compensable” period), and which must be itemized on the wage statement, regardless of whether the employee actually took only 8 minutes on one rest period (less than the amount of time that was “compensable”), or took 13 minutes on another rest period (more than the amount of time that was “compensable”).

Similarly, for recovery periods (“a cooldown period afforded an employee to prevent heat illness,” see Labor Code section 226.7), the employer will need to determine the amount of time that was “afforded” (i.e., authorized and permitted), which may depend on the circumstances. The amount of time that was afforded is the amount of time for which employees must be compensated (i.e., the “compensable” period) and which must be itemized on the wage statement.

Q. Why are there different rules for employers who pay on a semi-monthly basis?

A. Actually, the compensation requirements for rest and recovery periods are the same for all employers, including those that pay on a semi-monthly basis. For employers who pay on a semi-monthly basis, however, there is a provision that allows the employer to pay for rest and recovery periods at a rate of at least the minimum wage for the pay period in which the rest and recovery periods occurred, and then to “true up” the compensation owed (to pay “the additional compensation required”) applying the average hourly rate formula that is required and explained above, in the following pay period. This is because when a semi-monthly pay period ends in the middle of a workweek, it may not be possible to determine the “average hourly rate” for that workweek at the time the paycheck is issued for that payroll period.

This is consistent with existing rules in Labor Code section 204 that apply to employers who pay wages on a semi-monthly basis. That section provides, for example, that “all wages earned for labor in excess of the normal work period [e.g., overtime] shall be paid no later than the payday for the next regular payroll period.” (Labor Code §204(b)(1) (language in italics added).)

Q. What is “other nonproductive time”?

A. Labor Code section 226.2 defines “other nonproductive time” as “time under the employer’s control, exclusive of rest and recovery periods, that is not directly related to the activity being compensated on a piece-rate basis.”

What constitutes “other nonproductive time” under this definition will obviously vary depending upon the nature of the work and the “activity being compensated on a piece-rate basis.”

Q. What are the compensation requirements for other nonproductive time?

A. Labor Code section 226.2, subdivision (a)(1) and (a)(4) provide that:

  • Employees must be compensated for other nonproductive time separate from any piece-rate compensation, and
  • Employees must be compensated for other nonproductive time “at an hourly rate that is no less than the applicable minimum wage.

This means that piece-rate employees must be paid compensation for “other nonproductive time” that is separate from their piece-rate compensation. An employer may not treat the piece-rate compensation as including compensation for other nonproductive time, no matter how the piece-rate was determined.

The compensation requirement for other nonproductive time is simply that it be paid at an hourly rate of no less than the applicable minimum wage.

The statute also contains a kind of “safe harbor” provision in subdivision (a)(7), which states:

An employer, who in addition to paying any piece-rate compensation pays an hourly rate of at least the applicable minimum wage for all hours worked, shall be deemed in compliance with paragraph (4).

This means that if an employer pays a base hourly rate of at least the applicable minimum wage for all hours an employee works, in addition to any piece-rate compensation, the employer will be deemed in compliance with the compensation requirements for other nonproductive time.

Q. Does an employer need to track the amount of other nonproductive time worked by an employee who is compensated on a piece-rate basis?

A. It depends. If the employer utilizes the “safe harbor” option of subdivision (a)(7) (i.e., “in addition to paying any piece-rate compensation, pays an hourly rate of at least the applicable minimum wage for all hours worked”), then the compensation and wage statement requirements for other nonproductive time are satisfied, and the employer is not required to determine or to record the actual amount of hours worked in other nonproductive time. (See §226.2(a)(2)(B); (a)(4); (a)(7).)

If the employer does not use this “safe harbor” option of paying an hourly rate of at least minimum wage for all hours worked, then the amount of hours worked in other nonproductive time must be determined (§226.2(a)(5)), listed on the wage statement, (§226,2(a)(2)(B)), and compensated separately at an hourly rate of at least minimum wage (§226.2(a)(4)).

Subdivision (a)(5), however, provides that “[t]he amount of other nonproductive time may be determined either through actual records or the employer’s reasonable estimates, whether for a group of employees or for a particular employee, of other nonproductive time worked during the pay period.” (Labor Code §226.2(a)(5).) This allows employers the option of determining the amount of other nonproductive time worked based on a reasonable estimate, rather than actual tracking of time.

Subdivision (a)(6) further provides that:

An employer who is found to have made a good faith error in determining the total or estimated amount of other nonproductive time worked during the pay period shall remain liable for the payment of compensation for all hours worked in other nonproductive time, but shall not be liable for statutory civil penalties, including, but not limited to, penalties under Section 226.3, or liquidated damages based solely on that error, provided that both of the following are true:

A. The employer has provided the wage statement information required by subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2) and paid the compensation due for the amount of other nonproductive time determined by the employer in accordance with the requirements of paragraphs (4) and (5).

B. The total compensation paid for any day in the pay period is no less than what is due under the applicable minimum wage and any required overtime compensation.

In general terms, this means that if an employer makes a good faith error in determining the amount of other nonproductive time for a worker, whether determined through records or based on an estimate, in that the employee actually worked more other nonproductive time than was in the estimate or as otherwise determined by the employer, the employer remains liable to compensate the employee for all of the other nonproductive time the employee actually worked (at an hourly rate of at least minimum wage), but will not be liable for any statutory penalties.

This provision is subject to the two qualifications in subparagraphs (A) and (B), quoted above, including that the employer must have paid the employee at least minimum wage and any required overtime compensation on that minimum wage.

Q. Are there any wage statement requirements under this law?

A. Yes. Labor Code section 226.2, subdivision (a)(2) provides that:

The itemized statement required by subdivision (a) of [Labor Code] Section 226 shall, in addition to the other items specified in that subdivision, separately state the following, to which the provisions of Section 226 shall also be applicable:

  1. The total hours of compensable rest and recovery periods, the rate of compensation, and the gross wages paid for those periods during the pay period.
  2. Except for employers paying compensation for other nonproductive time in accordance with paragraph (7), the total hours of other nonproductive time, as determined under paragraph (5), the rate of compensation, and the gross wages paid for that time during the pay period.

As indicated in the language in italics above, an employer is not required to state the total hours of other nonproductive time, the rate of compensation, or the gross wages paid for that time, if the employer “in addition to paying any piece-rate compensation, pays an hourly rate of at least the applicable minimum wage for all hours worked,” as authorized by the “safe harbor” language in subdivision (a)(7).

The wage statement requirements should be read in tandem with the current requirement under section 226, subdivision (a), that an itemized wage statement show “all applicable hourly rates in effect during the pay period and the corresponding number of hours worked at each hourly rate by the employee…” (§226(a)(9)). To the extent there may be overlap between this provision and section 226.2(a)(2) going forward, the requirements will be harmonized. Employers will not be required to state the same information twice on the wage statement.

Back to top

Q. What is the affirmative defense that is created by the statute for time periods prior to January 1, 2016?

A. Labor Code section 226.2, subdivision (b) provides, in part, as follows:

Notwithstanding any other statute or regulation, the employer and any other person shall have an affirmative defense to any claim or cause of action for recovery of wages, damages, liquidated damages, statutory penalties, or civil penalties, including liquidated damages pursuant to Section 1194.2, statutory penalties pursuant to Section 203, premium pay pursuant to Section 226.7, and actual damages or liquidated damages pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 226, based solely on the employer’s failure to timely pay the employee the compensation due for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time for time periods prior to and including December 31, 2015, if, by no later than December 15, 2016, an employer complies with all of the following:…

The statute then sets forth a number of requirements an employer must meet in order to have the affirmative defense authorized by subdivision (b), quoted above.

In general terms, what this means is that, for time periods prior to January 1, 2016, an employer may be relieved of any liability for damages and statutory and other penalties, arising out of claims asserting a failure to pay compensation for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time, if the employer meets all of the requirements set forth in the statute.

Q. What does an employer need to do in order to have the affirmative defense created by the statute?

A. Subdivision (b) of the statute says that an employer must comply with “all of the following,” and then lists several requirements. The first listed requirement is that:

“The employer makes payments to each of its employees, except as specified in paragraph (2), for previously uncompensated or undercompensated rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time from July 1, 2012, to December 31, 2015, inclusive, using one of the formulas specified in subparagraph (A) or (B):

The affirmative defense provisions of Labor Code Section 226.2
(Relating to time periods prior to January 1, 2016)

Q. Does the statute have any effect on time periods prior to January 1, 2016?

A. The statute does not contain a provision stating that it is declarative of existing law. The compensation requirements for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time that are set forth in subdivision (a) of section 226.2 apply going forward as of the effective date of the statute (January 1, 2016), and do not change the law as it existed prior to that date. Issues as to what was required under applicable law prior to January 1, 2016 may be the subject of ongoing disputes and litigation in the courts.

Subdivision (b) of the statute, however, creates an “affirmative defense” for certain types of claims that may be pending in existing litigation, or that might be asserted in future litigation, with respect to time periods prior to January 1, 2016.

  1. The employer determines and pays the actual sums due together with accrued interest calculated in accordance with subdivision (c) of Section 98.1.
  2. The employer pays each employee an amount equal to 4 percent of that employee’s gross earnings in pay periods in which any work was performed on a piece-rate basis from July 1, 2012, to December 31, 2015, inclusive, less amounts already paid to that employee, separate from piece-rate compensation, for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time during the same time, provided that the amount by which the payment to each employee may be reduced for amounts already paid for other nonproductive time shall not exceed 1 percent of the employee’s gross earnings during the same time.”

There are several additional requirements set forth in subdivision (b), paragraphs (3) through (5), including that:

  • The employer must give notice to the Department of Industrial Relations by no later than July 1, 2016 of its election to make payments to its current and former employees pursuant to the statute.
  • The payments must be completed by December 15, 2016.
  • The payments to employees must come with a statement summarizing how the payment was calculated.
  • The employer must use due diligence to locate and pay former employees.
  • Payments for former employees who cannot be located must be made to the Labor Commissioner’s Unpaid Wage Fund (with an additional administrative fee).

Pursuant to an Order of the Fresno Superior Court, the State was temporarily restrained from enforcing the July 1, 2016 deadline for employers to submit notice of their election to make payments to current and former employees pursuant to Labor Code Section 226.2(b). Th e Director of Industrial Relations continued to accept and post these notices through July 28, 2016, when the temporary restraining order expired and the Court declined to extend it.

Q. If an employer elects to make the payments and meet the other requirements in order to have the affirmative defense, does the employer have to make payments to former employees?

A. Yes. The statute requires payments to “each” of the employer’s employees “for previously uncompensated or undercompensated rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time,” determined by using one of the formulas quoted above. Subdivision (a)(1) requires the employer to use due diligence to locate and pay former employees.

Payments are not required, however, for any time periods for which:

  1. An employee has, prior to August 1, 2015, entered into a valid release of claims not otherwise banned by this code or any other applicable law for compensation for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time.
  2. A release of claims covered by this subdivision [was] executed in connection with a settlement agreement filed with a court prior to October 1, 2015, and later approved by the court.

(See Labor Code §226.2(b)(2).)

In general terms, this means that payments are not required for employees who have previously settled claims related to compensation for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time.

Q. What is the notice that must be provided to the Department of Industrial Relations?

A. An employer that elects to participate in the affirmative defense provisions of the statute, must provide a written notice to the Department of Industrial Relations, by no later than July 1, 2016, of the employer’s election to make payments to its current and former employees.

The notice “must include the legal name and address of the employer and must be mailed or delivered to the Director of Industrial Relations, Attn: Piece-Rate Section, 226.2 Election Notice, 1515 Clay Street, 17th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612.”

The Department provided a simple online form that was used by employers for this purpose.

The Department will post on its website either a list of the employers who have provided the required notice or copies of the actual notices, and these materials will remain posted until March 31, 2017.

(See Labor Code §226.2(b)(3).)

Q. Is it possible to extend the deadline for providing notice to the Department of Industrial Relations?

A. The statute set a deadline of July 1, 2016.  A court order temporarily extended the deadline to July 28, 2016, but a request for a further extension was denied. Employers who failed to submit a notice by July 28, 2016 no longer have the option of providing this notice.

Q. What type of records does the employer have to provide concerning the payments that are made to employees for the purpose of obtaining the affirmative defense?

A. When an employer elects to make payments to current and former employees pursuant to subdivision (b) of the statute, the employer is required to provide the employee, along with the payment, a statement that, in general terms, explains that the payment is made pursuant to this statute, explains which of the formulas was used to determine the payment (i.e., whether it was actual sums due or the 4%-option), and explains the calculations that were made to determine the total payment.

Specifically:

  • If the payment is based on “actual sums due” option, the employee must be provided “a statement, spreadsheet, listing, or similar document that states, for each pay period for which compensation was included in the payment, the total hours of rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time of the employee, the rates of compensation for that time, and the gross wages paid for that time.”
  • If the payment is based on the “4%” option, the employee must be provided “a statement, spreadsheet, listing, or similar document that shows, for each pay period during which the employee had earnings during the period from July 1, 2012, through December 31, 2015, inclusive, the gross wages of the employee and any amounts already paid to the employee, separate from piece-rate compensation, for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time.”
  • Both types of statements must show “the calculations that were made to determine the total payment made.”

Note that under the 4% option an employer is only required to pay an employee an amount “equal to 4 percent of that employee’s gross earnings in pay periods in which any work was performed on a piece-rate basis from July 1, 2012, to December 31, 2015, inclusive, less amounts already paid to that employee, separate from piece-rate compensation, for rest and recovery periods and other nonproductive time during the same time, . . . .” In other words, the 4% only applies to pay periods in which some work was performed on a piece-rate basis. For purposes of showing the employee how the amount of the payment was determined, however, subdivision (b)(5)(D) requires a statement or similar document that includes all pay periods for which the employee had earnings during the July 1, 2012 to December 31, 2015 time period. This serves the purpose of showing the employee, if relevant, that there may have been pay periods in which he or she did not have any piece-rate earnings, and that the 4% calculation was thus not applied to those pay periods. The purpose of the statement that is required by this provision of the statute is simply to show the employee how the payment was calculated in terms of his or her own earnings history.

In addition, subdivision (d)(3) of the statute requires employers to preserve “all records of hours worked, calculations of hours worked, and records of payments made to employees and the Labor Commissioner pursuant to subdivision (b) and this subdivision, until December 16, 2020, and furnish the records related to an employee on request by the employee.”

Q. Are all employers required to make the payments described in the affirmative defense portions of the statute (subdivision (b))?

A. No. The provisions regarding payments to employees – for purposes of obtaining an affirmative defense to certain claims in litigation, as described in subdivision (b) of the statute – are entirely optional. An employer is not required to make the payments described in subdivision (b), paragraph (1) if it elects not to do so.

Q. What happens if an employer elects not to make the payments described in subdivision (b) of the statute?

A. If an employer elects not to make the payments and undertake the other obligations set forth in subdivision (b) of the statute that are required to obtain the affirmative defense, the employer’s legal rights and obligations under the law as it existed prior to January 1, 2016 remain unchanged and unaffected by this statute.

The requirements set forth in subdivision (a) of the statute go into effect for all employers on January 1, 2016.

Q. Are certain types of claims and cases excluded from the affirmative defense provisions in subdivision (b) of the statute?

A. Yes. In general terms, the affirmative defense provisions of the statute do not apply to cases in which there was a final judgment prior to the effective date of the statute, cases that had been pending and in litigation for a substantial period of time prior to the effective date of the statute (i.e., cases filed before March 1, 2014, with some additional specifications as set forth in the statute, that are likely well advanced in the litigation process), and cases that allege a specific kind of wage theft.

The provisions also are inapplicable to any claims alleging that “employees were not advised of their right to take rest or recovery breaks, that rest and recovery breaks were not made available, or that employees were discouraged or otherwise prevented from taking such breaks.” (§226.2(g)(3).) In other words, the affirmative defense provisions do not apply to claims that an employer did not authorize and permit employees to take rest periods, as distinct from claims alleging a failure to compensate for such periods.

Lastly, the affirmative defense provisions do not apply to employers that are new car dealers as defined in section 426 of the Vehicle Code.

Q. How are the back pay requirements being monitored and enforced?

A. Under the terms of the statute, the employer has an affirmative defense to certain claims if the employer complies with “all of” the obligations set forth in the statute. The Department of Industrial Relations is not authorized to supervise or oversee these payments, and will not issue any approvals or certifications that an employer has or has not followed the process correctly.  Whether the employer met the requirements for the affirmative defense may arise in any dispute over piece-rate compensation, either in litigation or in the context of a wage claim.  In the event of such a dispute, it will be up to the person hearing the dispute (i.e., the judge, hearing officer, or arbitrator) to decide whether the employer performed all of the obligations set forth in the statute in order to obtain the affirmative defense in that particular case.

Back to top

Calculating and making back payments to employees and former employees for purposes of the affirmative defense

Q. What does the 4% option (in Labor Code section 226.2 (b)(1)(B)) apply to?

A. The 4% calculation applies to each and every pay period, between July 1, 2012 to December 31, 2015, in which some part of the employee’s work was compensated on a piece-rate basis (including if the piece-rate was paid on top of an hourly rate). If an employee had pay periods with no piece-rate earnings (including payroll periods in which he or she was compensated solely on an hourly basis or received only vacation pay), then those pay periods are not included in the calculation. However, all other weeks must be included in the calculation, and the 4% calculation applies to the employee’s entire gross earnings in each of those pay periods.

Q. What is “accrued interest calculated in accordance with subdivision (c) of [Labor Code] Section 98.1”?  How is that interest calculated?

A. Labor Code section 98.1(c) provides for interest to accrue on all unpaid wages, from the date wages were due and payable, at the rate specified in subdivision (b) of Civil Code section 3289.  The rate specified in Civil Code section 3289(b) is ten percent per annum simple interest. 

The “date wages were due and payable” refers to the payday when the wages originally were due, and for purposes of Labor Code section 226.2, subdivision (b), corresponds to each payday covering work within the back pay period from July 1, 2012 through December 31, 2015.   A different interest calculation is required for each payroll period for which any wages are due, extending from that payday until the date of payment.  Thus, assuming the employer made these payments in July of 2016, exactly four years after the earliest payday in the period, it would require four years interest (4 years times 10% = 40%) on the additional wages due for that first pay period in July of 2012; and then 3 years and however many weeks interest on the wages due for the following payday; etc.; until arriving at the end of December of 2015, for which there would about 5% interest would have been required (10% per annum times six months = 5%).

Q. What efforts must be made by an employer to locate former employees?  What is meant by “due diligence”?

A. Labor Code section 226.2 does not define what constitutes “due diligence,” other than to state that it includes, but is not limited to “the use of people locator services.” (See Labor Code section 226.2, subdivision (d)(1).)  There are a variety of people locator services available on the Internet through which someone may search a name in an attempt to locate a current address.  Many of these services offer a one-month pass, for a small fee, that allows for an unlimited number of searches.  Given the statute’s reference to the use of people locator services, “due diligence” on an employer’s part likely would require use of one of these services for at least one search per employee for whom the employer does not have a current address.

Beyond this specific requirement, what constitutes “due diligence” would depend on the circumstances.  In general, the concept of due diligence incorporates elements of both reasonableness (what is reasonable under the circumstances?) and good faith (was a genuine effort made?).  As such, relevant factors would include the size of the payment being made to an employee and the nature and extent of the information the employer has about that employee.  For example, if the employer does not have current contact information for a former employee, but continues to employ the former employee’s brother, “due diligence” might require the employer to ask the brother if he has a current mailing address for the former employee.  If, on the other hand, the employer does not have a current address for a former employee, a people locator search is unsuccessful because the former employee has a very common name, and the employer has no other direct information about how to locate that person, then the employer may have done its “due diligence” as to that particular employee.

Another way to approach this question is to put oneself in the shoes of someone who has left the area but is now owed some money by a former employer – what efforts would you reasonably expect that employer to make to find you and make sure you get paid? 

Q. When should an employer do its due diligence, and how should an employer handle a situation in which a check has been sent to a former employee but has not been cashed or returned in the mail?

A. An employer can and should do its due diligence as soon as possible to find or confirm the addresses of former employees. If there is any question about whether an uncashed check reached its intended recipient, the employer may wish to cancel that check and reissue another one if the employer believes that it now has a better address. It probably is also worth the expense to send these checks (and accompanying statements) by certified mail, return receipt requested, so that the employer will have a record that it was delivered to the intended recipient. If the employer has made a diligent effort to track down a good address, but the check still couldn’t be delivered, then that employee’s payment can be redirected to the Unpaid Wage Fund. On the other hand, if there is no real doubt about the payment (and statement) having actually been delivered to the employee entitled to receive them, and then the employer has done its part, even if the check is not cashed right away.

Q. Is it possible to extend the deadline for making back payments to former employees?  How can an employer do its “due diligence” on checks that are returned after the December 15 deadline and yet still get the unpaid funds to the Labor Commissioner by that deadline?

A. The December 15 deadline is in the statute and cannot be changed. The statute actually directs employers to begin making payments “as soon as reasonably feasible” and to complete those payments “by no later than December 15, 2016.”  With that in mind, there is no need to wait until December 15 before doing due diligence and making payments.  Employers should first make their best effort to track down a good address (as discussed in the earlier answers to “due diligence” questions) before sending a payment to a former employee.  Sending the payment to that address by certified mail, return receipt requested, will provide confirmation that it was delivered to the intended person.  Then, once the employer has confirmed which employees received their payments, the employer can determine which former employees were not successfully located and redirect their payments to the Unpaid Wage Fund. 

Q. How does an employer go about making payments to the Labor Commissioner “pursuant to [Labor Code] Section 96.7” for former employees who could not be located?

A. Employers who have elected to participate in the affirmative defense provisions of the statute are required, among other obligations, to make “payments by no later than December 15, 2016, to each employee to whom the wages are due, or to the Labor Commissioner pursuant to Section 96.7 for any employee whom the employer cannot locate.” (Labor Code section 226.2(b)(4) [emphasis added].) Labor Code section 96.7 refers to the Industrial Relations Unpaid Wage Fund.

Employers must use due diligence to track down and pay former employees. If unsuccessful, the money due to employees who cannot be located must be paid into the Unpaid Wage Fund. This payment must be accompanied by an additional administrative fee equal to one-half of one percent of the “aggregate payments made” or $2,500, whichever is less.

Instructions for making payments to the Unpaid Wage Fund:

Required items:

1. A statement in both printed and electronic format* that lists the following information for each employee covered by the payment:

  • Name
  • Net amount payable to the employee after withholding**
  • If available, employee’s last known address and social security number

2. One check for the total of all amounts being paid into the Fund at that time for employees who could not be located.

Make this check payable to:
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS UNPAID WAGE FUND

3. A second check equal to ½ of 1% (.005) of the amount in item 2 or $2500.00, whichever is less.

Make this check payable to:
LABOR ENFORCEMENT AND COMPLIANCE FUND

Please send all of these items by no later than December 15, 2016, to the following address.

Department of Industrial Relations
AB 1513 Application
1515 Clay St., 17th Floor
Oakland, CA 94612

We recommend sending everything by certified mail, return receipt requested, in order to confirm timely delivery and receipt.

*Providing Statement to Unpaid Wage Fund in Electronic Format

Employers are encouraged to use the Form 40  when reporting wage payments to the Unpaid Wage Fund. An electronic copy of the Form 40 or other statement should be placed on a password-protected CD or thumb drive that is sent along with the physical payment. (Please include contact information on the cover letter, so the Labor Commissioner’s staff can contact you to obtain the password.)  Otherwise, the information can be sent by email to 3rdPartySettlements-UWF&AB1513@dir.ca.gov .  If sent by email, the transmission should be encrypted, and the sender will also need to provide enough information in the email message to associate the transmission with the items arriving by regular mail. 

**Note on Payroll Taxes and Withholding:

The payments to be made to employees and former employees under Labor Code section 226.2 are in the nature of back wages or supplemental wages, and are subject to payroll taxes, tax withholding, and tax reporting. This is true of both the payments made directly to current and former employees who are located, and for former employees who could not be located and whose payment will be made into the Unpaid Wage Fund. If an employer is making a payment into the Unpaid Wage Fund for a former employee who could not be located, the employer should perform all tax withholding, tax payment and tax reporting for that payment, and pay only the net amount due to the employee into the Unpaid Wage Fund.

If employers have questions about how to properly handle payroll taxes, withholding and reporting for these payments, they may contact the EDD Taxpayer Assistance Center at 1-888-745-3886.

Finally, employers are reminded of their obligation under subdivision (d)(3) of Section 226.2 to “preserve all records of hours worked, calculations of hours worked, and records of payments made to employees and the Labor Commissioner . . . until December 16, 2020, and furnish the records related to an employee on request by the employee.”

Q. What if an employer sent checks to former employees before the deadline but those checks were never cashed?

A. If the checks are no longer negotiable or still remain uncashed after a reasonable amount of time has passed, employers can turn over the outstanding payments to the Unpaid Wage Fund.  Employers are encouraged to follow the instructions listed above when turning over these payments, but may take the payments to any office of the Labor Commissioner.

Employee claims about Piece-Rate compensation

Q. How does an employee claim funds that were sent to the Unpaid Wage Fund?

A.Employees eligible for back pay under AB 1513 may have had their payments turned over to the Labor Commissioner’s Unpaid Wage Fund. Employees who believe their payment may have turned over to the Unpaid Wage Fund should use this form to request payment. Please complete the form and mail it to the address below or take it to any local office of the Labor Commissioner.

Department of Industrial Relations
AB 1513 Application

Centralized Cashiering Unit
2031 Howe Avenue, Suite 100
Sacramento, CA 95825

Q. What can an employee do if an employer violates the piece rate pay requirements?

A. An employee who has not been paid compensation due under Labor Code section 226.2 or any other wage and hour law can bring a legal claim to recover wages due and possibly related damages and penalties. Generally speaking, there are three ways to present such a claim – through the Labor Commissioner, through an alternative dispute resolution system such as arbitration (if required or allowed under an employment agreement), or through a lawsuit in court. Employees pursuing the first option can file an individual wage claim with the Labor Commissioner’s Wage Claim Adjudication Unit, or they can file a Report of Labor Law Violation with the Labor Commissioner’s Bureau of Field Enforcement, which does not pursue individual claims, but may investigate and cite the employer. More information about wage claims and employee rights in general is available on the Labor Commissioner’s website or any of the Labor Commissioner’s local offices.

Espanol

Información general
P. ¿Cuándo entra en vigor la ley?

R. Por aplicación de la ley, AB 1513 entró en vigor el 1 de enero de 2016.

P. ¿Qué hace AB 1513?

A. AB 1513 agrega la sección 226.2 al Código Laboral de California, que se aplica “a los empleados que son compensados ​​a destajo por cualquier trabajo realizado durante un período de pago”.

En términos generales, la sección 226.2 del Código Laboral hace dos cosas:

Establece los requisitos de compensación y declaración de salarios para los períodos de descanso y recuperación y “otro tiempo no productivo” para los empleados a destajo a partir de la fecha de vigencia del estatuto.
Establece, para ciertos empleadores y bajo ciertas circunstancias, una “defensa afirmativa” a cualquier reclamo o causa de acción por daños o sanciones legales basadas en el supuesto incumplimiento de un empleador de pagar la compensación debida por los períodos de descanso y recuperación y otro tiempo no productivo por períodos de tiempo. antes de la fecha de vigencia del estatuto.
P. ¿Qué es la compensación por pieza?

R. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral no cambia la definición existente de lo que constituye una compensación por “pago a destajo”.

El Manual de Cumplimiento de Normas Laborales existente de la División de Trabajo contiene la siguiente explicación de la compensación a destajo:

2.5.1 Tarifa por pieza o “trabajo por pieza”

El American Heritage Dictionary define el término a destajo como: “Trabajo pagado de acuerdo con la cantidad de unidades producidas”. En consecuencia, una tarifa a destajo debe basarse en una cifra determinable que se paga por completar una tarea en particular o fabricar una mercancía en particular.

P. ¿Este estatuto cambia los requisitos de compensación por horas extras?

A. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral establece expresamente en el párrafo inicial que “no se interpretará que limita o altera el salario mínimo o los requisitos de compensación por horas extras, o la obligación de compensar a los empleados por todas las horas trabajadas bajo cualquier otro estatuto u ordenanza local”.

Esto significa que en cualquier semana laboral en la que un empleado a destajo trabajó horas extra, la compensación por horas extra debe calcularse y pagarse de acuerdo con la ley vigente.

Volver arriba

Requisitos de compensación de tarifa por pieza y declaración de salario a partir del 1 de enero de 2016 y posteriores
P. ¿Cuáles son los requisitos de compensación para los períodos de descanso y recuperación para los empleados a destajo?

A. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral, subdivisión (a), párrafos (1) y (3) dispone que:

Los empleados deben ser compensados ​​por períodos de descanso y recuperación separados de cualquier compensación a destajo, y
La tasa de compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación será el mayor de:
Una tarifa por hora promedio determinada dividiendo la compensación total de la semana laboral, excluida la compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación y cualquier compensación prima por horas extraordinarias, por el total de horas trabajadas durante la semana laboral, excluidos los períodos de descanso y recuperación.
El salario mínimo aplicable.
Esto significa que los empleados a destajo deben recibir una compensación por los períodos de descanso y recuperación que es independiente de su compensación a destajo. Un empleador no puede considerar la compensación por pieza como una compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación, sin importar cómo se haya determinado la tarifa por pieza.

La tarifa por hora de compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación debe ser la misma que la tarifa por hora (promediada durante la semana laboral) que un empleado ganó durante la semana laboral por el tiempo durante el cual estuvo realizando el trabajo. Si, por alguna razón, esta tarifa promedio por hora resulta ser menor que el salario mínimo, entonces el empleado debe recibir el salario mínimo.

  1. Para una semana laboral de compensación a destajo y una tarifa base de salario mínimo para todas las horas trabajadas:
    Un empleado trabaja una semana laboral de 5 días y 40 horas.
    El empleado tiene dos períodos de descanso de 10 minutos autorizados y permitidos por día, por un total de 100 minutos (1,67 horas) de períodos de descanso por semana laboral.
    Al empleado se le paga el salario mínimo ($ 10 / hora) por todas las horas trabajadas, incluidos los dos períodos de descanso de 10 minutos, por un total de $ 400.
    El empleado también gana un total de $ 300 en compensación a destajo durante la semana laboral.
    La tarifa media por hora a pagar por los períodos de descanso de este empleado se calcula de la siguiente manera:
    $ 683.30 Compensación total por la semana laboral, sin incluir la compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación, que son los $ 300 en compensación a destajo, más el salario mínimo pagado por todas las horas trabajadas excepto las 1.67 horas del período de descanso.
    ÷ 38,33 Horas totales menos periodos de descanso
    = $ 17,83 / hora
    Nota: $ 10 / hora de este tiempo ya se calcula y se paga en el salario mínimo del empleado de $ 10 / hora por todas las horas trabajadas, incluido el período de descanso.

Por lo tanto, el monto adicional adeudado por los períodos de descanso en este ejemplo es $ 7.83 / hora.

Compensación total por semana laboral:
$ 400 Salario mínimo por todas las horas trabajadas, incluido el período de descanso

  • $ 300 de compensación por pieza
  • $ 7.83 x 1.67 horas = $ 13.08 Monto adicional sobre el salario mínimo requerido para pagar la tarifa por hora promedio correcta para los períodos de descanso
    = $ 713.08
  1. Para una semana laboral con trabajo a destajo y trabajo por horas:

Un empleado trabaja una semana laboral de 5 días y 40 horas.
En dos días de 8 horas de esta semana laboral (por un total de 16 horas), el empleado trabaja a una tarifa de $ 10 por hora y no trabaja a destajo.
En los otros tres días de la semana (por un total de 24 horas), el empleado solo trabaja a destajo y gana un total de $ 300 en compensación a destajo.
En cada día de la semana laboral, el empleado tiene dos períodos de descanso de 10 minutos autorizados y permitidos, por un total de 100 minutos (1,67 horas) de períodos de descanso por semana laboral.
En los dos días de trabajo por hora, estos períodos de descanso se compensan con el salario de $ 10 por hora.

La tarifa media por hora a pagar por los períodos de descanso de este empleado se calcula de la siguiente manera:
$ 453.30 Compensación total por semana laboral, sin incluir compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación, que son los $ 300 en compensación a destajo, más los $ 160 por trabajo por hora, menos $ 6.70, que es la compensación por los 40 minutos de descanso y períodos de recuperación en los dos días con tarifa horaria.
÷ 38,33 horas totales, que son 40 horas menos las 1,67 horas del período de descanso
= $ 11.83 / hora Nota: Para los días en los que el empleado trabajó a una tarifa por hora, ya se pagaron $ 10 / hora de este tiempo como parte de la tarifa por hora. Durante esos dos días, al empleado solo se le debe un adicional de $ 1.83 / hora por los períodos de descanso. Para los días en que el empleado realizó trabajo a destajo, la tarifa a pagar por los períodos de descanso es de $ 11,83.
Compensación total por semana laboral:
$ 160 Por la tarifa por hora trabajada en dos días

  • $ 300 de compensación por pieza
  • $ 1.83 x .67 horas = $ 1.23 La cantidad adicional adeuda por los períodos de descanso en los días con tarifa por hora para llevarlos a la tarifa por hora promedio para la semana laboral.
  • $ 11.83 x 1.0 hora Para los períodos de descanso en los días a destajo
    = $ 473.06
  1. Para una semana laboral de compensación a destajo y horas extra:

Un empleado trabaja una semana laboral de 6 días y 47 horas, de las cuales 7 horas constituyen horas extraordinarias.
El empleado tiene dos períodos de descanso de 10 minutos autorizados y permitidos por día, por un total de 120 minutos (2.0 horas) de períodos de descanso por semana laboral.
El empleado gana un total de $ 800 en compensación a destajo durante la semana laboral.
La tarifa media por hora a pagar por los períodos de descanso de este empleado se calcula de la siguiente manera:
$ 800 Compensación total por la semana laboral, sin incluir compensación por los períodos de descanso y recuperación o pago de prima por horas extras.

÷ 45 horas Total de horas, sin incluir los períodos de descanso y recuperación.

$ 17.78 / hora

x 2.0 horas

= $ 35.56 Compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación para esta semana laboral.
La compensación de la prima por horas extra para este empleado es:
$ 800 de compensación por pieza

  • $ 35.56 Compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación
    = $ 835.56
    ÷ 47 horas
    = 17,78 / hora Tarifa de pago normal
    x .5
    = $ 8.89 Pago de prima adeudado por horas extra
    x 7 horas Horas extras
    = $ 62.23
    Compensación total por semana laboral:
    $ 800 de compensación por pieza
  • $ 35.56 Compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación
  • $ 62.23 Pago premium por horas extra
    = $ 897.79

P. Si un empleador paga una tarifa base por hora por todas las horas trabajadas (por ejemplo, el salario mínimo), pero también paga una compensación adicional a destajo, ¿es suficiente que el empleador solo pague el salario mínimo por los descansos del empleado?

R. No. En el futuro, el estatuto requiere una compensación a una tarifa promedio por hora determinada dividiendo la compensación total por el total de horas trabajadas en la semana laboral, como se explicó anteriormente. Esto alienta a los empleados a tomar sus descansos autorizados, sin sentir que al hacerlo disminuirá su compensación.

P. ¿Qué tipos de compensación deben incluirse al determinar la tarifa promedio por hora que se pagará por los períodos de descanso y recuperación?

A. El estatuto dice que la tarifa promedio por hora se determinará “dividiendo la compensación total por la semana laboral, sin incluir la compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación y cualquier compensación prima por horas extra, por el total de horas trabajadas durante la semana laboral, sin incluir el descanso y períodos de recuperación “.

Como se indicó anteriormente, el estatuto se refiere a la “compensación total” por la semana laboral. Este tipo de fórmula es similar a la forma en que los empleadores están obligados actualmente a calcular una tasa de pago regular para fines de compensación por horas extra. El Manual de Cumplimiento de Normas de la División de Trabajo contiene información sobre los tipos de compensación dentro de una semana laboral que generalmente se deben incluir para este propósito y los que no lo están. (Consulte el Manual DLSE, §49.1 a 49.1.2.3 (elementos que se incluirán) y §49.1.2.4 (tipos de compensación no incluidos).

P. ¿Qué son los “períodos de descanso y recuperación”, como se menciona en el estatuto?

A. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral no cambia la definición de períodos de descanso y recuperación. Esos términos tienen el mismo significado que tienen bajo la ley vigente.

Los períodos de “descanso” se definen y exigen en una serie de órdenes de salario existentes. Por ejemplo, la Orden de salario 1 existente (Industria manufacturera) contiene la siguiente disposición con respecto a los períodos de descanso:

  1. Períodos de descanso

A. Todo empleador deberá autorizar y permitir que todos los empleados tomen períodos de descanso, los cuales, en la medida de lo posible, deberán ser a la mitad de cada período de trabajo. El tiempo del período de descanso autorizado se basará en el total de horas trabajadas diariamente a razón de diez (10) minutos de tiempo de descanso neto por cada cuatro (4) horas o una fracción importante del mismo. Sin embargo, no es necesario que se autorice un período de descanso para los empleados cuyo tiempo total de trabajo diario sea inferior a tres horas y media (3 1/2). El período de descanso autorizado se contará como horas trabajadas por las cuales no habrá deducción del salario.

B. Si un empleador no proporciona a un empleado un período de descanso de acuerdo con las disposiciones aplicables de esta orden, el empleador deberá pagar al empleado una (1) hora de pago a la tarifa regular de compensación del empleado por cada día de trabajo que el resto no se proporciona el período.

(Orden de salario 1, ¶12, 8 CCR sección 11010.)

La mayoría de las órdenes salariales existentes contienen disposiciones similares o idénticas sobre los períodos de descanso.

La sección 226.7 del Código Laboral existente define un “período de recuperación” como “un período de enfriamiento que se le otorga a un empleado para prevenir enfermedades causadas por el calor”.

La sección 226.7 del Código Laboral también establece que:

(b) Un empleador no deberá exigir que un empleado trabaje durante una comida o un período de descanso o recuperación exigido de conformidad con un estatuto aplicable, o reglamento, norma u orden aplicable de la Comisión de Bienestar Industrial, la Junta de Normas de Salud y Seguridad Ocupacional, o la División de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional.

En Brinker Restaurant Corp.v. Corte Superior (2012) 53 Cal.4th 1004, 1029, la Corte Suprema de California dijo lo siguiente con respecto a los períodos de descanso (aplicando la Orden de Salarios 5):

Los empleados tienen derecho a 10 minutos de descanso para turnos de tres y media a seis horas de duración, 20 minutos para turnos de más de seis horas hasta 10 horas, 30 minutos para turnos de más de 10 horas hasta 14 horas, y pronto.

(Id. En 1029.) Ver también Brinker, supra, 53 Cal.4th en 1033 (“Se requiere que un empleador autorice y permita la cantidad de tiempo de descanso requerido por la orden de salario para su industria”).

P. ¿La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral significa que los empleadores deberán realizar un seguimiento de la cantidad de minutos que los empleados realmente toman para sus períodos de descanso y recuperación?

R. No. La sección 226.2, subdivisión (a) (2) requiere que la declaración de salarios detallada de un empleado indique “[l] a horas totales de períodos de descanso y recuperación compensables, la tasa de compensación y los salarios brutos pagados por esos períodos durante el período de pago “. (Énfasis añadido.)

Si un empleador ha autorizado y permitido dos períodos de descanso de 10 minutos durante el turno de trabajo de un empleado (consulte la cita de Brinker más arriba), los períodos de descanso y recuperación “compensables” son aquellos que han sido autorizados y permitidos de acuerdo con la ley existente. Esa es la cantidad de tiempo por la cual un empleado debe ser compensado (es decir, el período “compensable”), y que debe detallarse en la declaración de salarios, independientemente de si el empleado realmente tomó solo 8 minutos en un período de descanso (menos de la cantidad de tiempo que fue “compensable”), o tomó 13 minutos en otro período de descanso (más que la cantidad de tiempo que fue “compensable”).

De manera similar, para los períodos de recuperación (“un período de enfriamiento otorgado a un empleado para prevenir enfermedades causadas por el calor”, consulte la sección 226.7 del Código Laboral), el empleador deberá determinar la cantidad de tiempo que se “concedió” (es decir, autorizado y permitido), que puede depender de las circunstancias. La cantidad de tiempo que se otorgó es la cantidad de tiempo por el cual los empleados deben ser compensados ​​(es decir, el período “compensable”) y que debe detallarse en la declaración de salarios.

P. ¿Por qué existen diferentes reglas para los empleadores que pagan cada dos meses?

R. En realidad, los requisitos de compensación para los períodos de descanso y recuperación son los mismos para todos los empleadores, incluidos aquellos que pagan quincenalmente. Sin embargo, para los empleadores que pagan semestralmente, existe una disposición que permite al empleador pagar los períodos de descanso y recuperación a una tasa de al menos el salario mínimo para el período de pago en el que ocurrieron los períodos de descanso y recuperación. y luego “compensar” la compensación adeuda (para pagar “la compensación adicional requerida”) aplicando la fórmula de tarifa promedio por hora que se requiere y explica anteriormente, en el siguiente período de pago. Esto se debe a que cuando un período de pago semestral finaliza en medio de una semana laboral, es posible que no sea posible determinar la “tarifa promedio por hora” para esa semana laboral en el momento en que se emite el cheque de pago para ese período de nómina.

Esto es consistente con las reglas existentes en la sección 204 del Código Laboral que se aplican a los empleadores que pagan salarios cada dos meses. Esa sección establece, por ejemplo, que “todos los salarios devengados por el trabajo en exceso del período normal de trabajo [por ejemplo, horas extraordinarias] se pagarán a más tardar el día de pago del siguiente período regular de nómina”. (Código Laboral §204 (b) (1) (se agregó el idioma en cursiva).)

P. ¿Qué es “otro tiempo improductivo”?

A. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral define “otro tiempo no productivo” como “tiempo bajo el control del empleador, sin incluir los períodos de descanso y recuperación, que no está directamente relacionado con la actividad que se compensa a destajo”.

Lo que constituye “otro tiempo no productivo” según esta definición variará obviamente según la naturaleza del trabajo y la “actividad que se compensa a destajo”.

P. ¿Cuáles son los requisitos de compensación por otro tiempo no productivo?

A. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral, subdivisión (a) (1) y (a) (4) dispone que:

Los empleados deben ser compensados ​​por otro tiempo no productivo aparte de cualquier compensación a destajo, y
Los empleados deben ser compensados ​​por otro tiempo no productivo “a una tarifa por hora que no sea menor que el salario mínimo aplicable.
Esto significa que los empleados a destajo deben recibir una compensación por “otro tiempo no productivo” que es independiente de su compensación a destajo. Un empleador no puede considerar la compensación por pieza como una compensación por otro tiempo no productivo, sin importar cómo se haya determinado la tarifa por pieza.

El requisito de compensación por otro tiempo no productivo es simplemente que se pague a una tarifa por hora no menor que el salario mínimo aplicable.

El estatuto también contiene una especie de disposición de “puerto seguro” en la subdivisión (a) (7), que establece:

Un empleador, que además de pagar cualquier compensación a destajo paga una tarifa por hora de al menos el salario mínimo aplicable por todas las horas trabajadas, se considerará que cumple con el párrafo (4).

Esto significa que si un empleador paga una tarifa base por hora de al menos el salario mínimo aplicable por todas las horas que trabaja un empleado, además de cualquier compensación a destajo, se considerará que el empleador cumple con los requisitos de compensación por otro tiempo no productivo.

P. ¿Necesita un empleador realizar un seguimiento de la cantidad de otro tiempo no productivo trabajado por un empleado que recibe una compensación a destajo?

A. Depende. Si el empleador utiliza la opción de “puerto seguro” de la subdivisión (a) (7) (es decir, “además de pagar cualquier compensación a destajo, paga una tarifa por hora de al menos el salario mínimo aplicable por todas las horas trabajadas”), entonces se satisfacen los requisitos de compensación y declaración de salario por otro tiempo no productivo, y no se requiere que el empleador determine o registre la cantidad real de horas trabajadas en otro tiempo no productivo. (Ver §226.2 (a) (2) (B); (a) (4); (a) (7).)

Si el empleador no usa esta opción de “puerto seguro” de pagar una tarifa por hora de al menos el salario mínimo por todas las horas trabajadas, entonces se debe determinar la cantidad de horas trabajadas en otro tiempo no productivo (§226.2 (a) (5)) , enumerados en la declaración de salarios, (§226,2 (a) (2) (B)), y compensados ​​por separado a una tarifa por hora de al menos el salario mínimo (§226.2 (a) (4)).

La subdivisión (a) (5), sin embargo, establece que “[l] a cantidad de otro tiempo no productivo puede determinarse a través de registros reales o estimaciones razonables del empleador, ya sea para un grupo de empleados o para un empleado en particular, de otros tiempo trabajado durante el período de pago “. (Código Laboral §226.2 (a) (5).) Esto permite a los empleadores la opción de determinar la cantidad de otro tiempo no productivo trabajado con base en una estimación razonable, en lugar del seguimiento real del tiempo.

La subdivisión (a) (6) establece además que:

Un empleador que haya cometido un error de buena fe al determinar la cantidad total o estimada de otro tiempo no productivo trabajado durante el período de pago seguirá siendo responsable del pago de compensación por todas las horas trabajadas en otro tiempo no productivo, pero no será responsable. para sanciones civiles estatutarias, incluidas, entre otras, sanciones según la Sección 226.3, o daños liquidados basados ​​únicamente en ese error, siempre que se cumplan las dos condiciones siguientes:

A. El empleador ha proporcionado la información de la declaración de salarios requerida por el subpárrafo (B) del párrafo (2) y ha pagado la compensación adeuda por la cantidad de otro tiempo no productivo determinado por el empleador de acuerdo con los requisitos de los párrafos (4) y (5). ).

B. La compensación total pagada por cualquier día en el período de pago no es menor que lo que se adeuda según el salario mínimo aplicable y cualquier compensación requerida por horas extras.

En términos generales, esto significa que si un empleador comete un error de buena fe al determinar la cantidad de otro tiempo no productivo para un trabajador, ya sea determinado a través de registros o basado en una estimación, el empleado realmente trabajó más tiempo no productivo que en la estimación o según lo determine el empleador, el empleador sigue siendo responsable de compensar al empleado por todo el resto del tiempo no productivo que el empleado realmente trabajó (a una tarifa por hora de al menos el salario mínimo), pero no será responsable de ninguna sanción legal .

Esta disposición está sujeta a los dos requisitos en los subpárrafos (A) y (B), citados anteriormente, incluyendo que el empleador debe haber pagado al empleado al menos el salario mínimo y cualquier compensación requerida por horas extras sobre ese salario mínimo.

P. ¿Existe algún requisito de declaración de salario bajo esta ley?

A. Sí. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral, subdivisión (a) (2) establece que:

La declaración detallada requerida por la subdivisión (a) de la Sección 226 del [Código Laboral] deberá, además de los otros elementos especificados en esa subdivisión, establecer por separado lo siguiente, a lo que también se aplicarán las disposiciones de la Sección 226:

Las horas totales de los períodos de descanso y recuperación compensables, la tasa de compensación y los salarios brutos pagados por esos períodos durante el período de pago.
Excepto por los empleadores que paguen compensación por otro tiempo no productivo de acuerdo con el párrafo (7), el total de horas de otro tiempo no productivo, según se determina en el párrafo (5), la tasa de compensación y los salarios brutos pagados por ese tiempo durante el período de pago. .
Como se indica en el lenguaje en cursiva anterior, un empleador no está obligado a indicar el total de horas de otro tiempo no productivo, la tasa de compensación o los salarios brutos pagados por ese tiempo, si el empleador “además de pagar una tarifa por pieza compensación, paga una tarifa por hora de al menos el salario mínimo aplicable por todas las horas trabajadas ”, según lo autorizado por el lenguaje de“ puerto seguro ”en la subdivisión (a) (7).

Los requisitos de la declaración de salarios deben leerse junto con el requisito actual según la sección 226, subdivisión (a), de que una declaración de salarios detallada muestre “todas las tarifas por hora aplicables vigentes durante el período de pago y el número correspondiente de horas trabajadas a cada tarifa por hora por el empleado … ”(§226 (a) (9)). En la medida en que pueda haber una superposición entre esta disposición y la sección 226.2 (a) (2) en el futuro, los requisitos se armonizarán. No se requerirá que los empleadores proporcionen la misma información dos veces en la declaración de salarios.

Volver arriba

Las disposiciones de defensa afirmativa de la Sección 226.2 del Código Laboral
(Relativo a períodos anteriores al 1 de enero de 2016)
P. ¿Tiene el estatuto algún efecto sobre los períodos anteriores al 1 de enero de 2016?

R. El estatuto no contiene una disposición que establezca que es declarativa de la ley existente. Los requisitos de compensación para los períodos de descanso y recuperación y otro tiempo no productivo que se establecen en la subdivisión (a) de la sección 226.2 se aplican en el futuro a partir de la fecha de vigencia del estatuto (1 de enero de 2016) y no cambian la ley ya que existía antes de esa fecha. Las cuestiones relativas a lo que exigía la ley aplicable antes del 1 de enero de 2016 pueden ser objeto de disputas y litigios en los tribunales.

Sin embargo, la subdivisión (b) del estatuto crea una “defensa afirmativa” para ciertos tipos de reclamos que pueden estar pendientes en un litigio existente, o que podrían afirmarse en un litigio futuro, con respecto a períodos anteriores al 1 de enero de 2016.

P. ¿Cuál es la defensa afirmativa que crea el estatuto para períodos anteriores al 1 de enero de 2016?

A. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral, subdivisión (b), establece, en parte, lo siguiente:

Sin perjuicio de cualquier otro estatuto o reglamento, el empleador y cualquier otra persona tendrán una defensa afirmativa ante cualquier reclamo o causa de acción para la recuperación de salarios, daños, daños liquidados, sanciones legales o sanciones civiles, incluidos los daños liquidados de conformidad con la Sección 1194.2, sanciones estatutarias de conformidad con la Sección 203, pago de prima de conformidad con la Sección 226.7, y daños reales o daños liquidados de conformidad con la subdivisión (e) de la Sección 226, basados ​​únicamente en la falta del empleador de pagar oportunamente al empleado la compensación debida por los períodos de descanso y recuperación y otro tiempo no productivo para períodos anteriores al 31 de diciembre de 2015 inclusive, si, a más tardar el 15 de diciembre de 2016, un empleador cumple con todo lo siguiente: …

El estatuto luego establece una serie de requisitos que un empleador debe cumplir para que la defensa afirmativa sea autorizada por la subdivisión (b), citada anteriormente.

En términos generales, lo que esto significa es que, durante períodos de tiempo anteriores al 1 de enero de 2016, un empleador puede quedar eximido de cualquier responsabilidad por daños y sanciones legales y de otro tipo, que surjan de reclamaciones que afirmen la falta de pago de una indemnización por descanso y recuperación. períodos y otro tiempo improductivo, si el empleador cumple con todos los requisitos establecidos en el estatuto.

P. ¿Qué debe hacer un empleador para que el estatuto cree la defensa afirmativa?

R. La subdivisión (b) del estatuto dice que un empleador debe cumplir con “todo lo siguiente” y luego enumera varios requisitos. El primer requisito enumerado es que:

“El empleador realiza pagos a cada uno de sus empleados, excepto según se especifica en el párrafo (2), por períodos de descanso y recuperación previamente no compensados ​​o subcompensados ​​y otro tiempo no productivo desde el 1 de julio de 2012 hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2015, inclusive, utilizando uno de los las fórmulas especificadas en el subpárrafo (A) o (B):

El empleador determina y paga las sumas reales adeudadas junto con los intereses acumulados calculados de acuerdo con la subdivisión (c) de la Sección 98.1.
El empleador paga a cada empleado una cantidad equivalente al 4 por ciento de los ingresos brutos de ese empleado en los períodos de pago en los que el trabajo se realizó a destajo desde el 1 de julio de 2012 hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2015, inclusive, menos las cantidades ya pagadas a ese empleado, separado de la remuneración a destajo, por los períodos de descanso y recuperación y otro tiempo no productivo durante el mismo tiempo, siempre que el monto por el cual se pueda reducir el pago a cada empleado por los montos ya pagados por otro tiempo no productivo no excederá de 1 por ciento de los ingresos brutos del empleado durante el mismo tiempo “.
Hay varios requisitos adicionales establecidos en la subdivisión (b), párrafos (3) al (5), que incluyen que:

El empleador debe notificar al Departamento de Relaciones Industriales a más tardar el 1 de julio de 2016 de su elección para realizar pagos a sus empleados actuales y anteriores de conformidad con el estatuto.
Los pagos deben completarse antes del 15 de diciembre de 2016.
Los pagos a los empleados deben venir con un estado de cuenta que resuma cómo se calculó el pago.
El empleador debe actuar con la debida diligencia para localizar y pagar a los ex empleados.
Los pagos a los ex empleados que no puedan ser localizados deben hacerse al Fondo de Salarios No Pagados del Comisionado Laboral (con una tarifa administrativa adicional).
De conformidad con una Orden del Tribunal Superior de Fresno, el Estado no pudo hacer cumplir temporalmente la fecha límite del 1 de julio de 2016 para que los empleadores presenten un aviso de su elección para realizar pagos a los empleados actuales y anteriores de conformidad con la Sección 226.2 (b) del Código Laboral. El Director de Relaciones Industriales continuó aceptando y publicando estos avisos hasta el 28 de julio de 2016, cuando expiró la orden de restricción temporal y el Tribunal se negó a extenderla.

P. Si un empleador elige hacer los pagos y cumplir con los otros requisitos para tener la defensa afirmativa, ¿el empleador tiene que hacer pagos a los ex empleados?

A. Sí. El estatuto requiere pagos a “cada uno” de los empleados del empleador “por períodos de descanso y recuperación previamente no compensados ​​o subcompensados ​​y otro tiempo no productivo”, determinados mediante el uso de una de las fórmulas citadas anteriormente. La subdivisión (a) (1) requiere que el empleador utilice la debida diligencia para ubicar y pagar a los ex empleados.

Sin embargo, no se requieren pagos por ningún período de tiempo para el cual:

Un empleado, antes del 1 de agosto de 2015, firmó una exención válida de reclamos no prohibidos por este código o cualquier otra ley aplicable por compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación y otro tiempo no productivo.
Se ejecutó una liberación de reclamos cubiertos por esta subdivisión en relación con un acuerdo de conciliación presentado ante un tribunal antes del 1 de octubre de 2015 y posteriormente aprobado por el tribunal.
(Vea el Código Laboral §226.2 (b) (2).)

En términos generales, esto significa que no se requieren pagos para los empleados que hayan liquidado previamente reclamaciones relacionadas con la compensación por períodos de descanso y recuperación y otro tiempo no productivo.

P. ¿Cuál es el aviso que se debe proporcionar al Departamento de Relaciones Industriales?

A. Un empleador que opte por participar en las disposiciones de defensa afirmativa del estatuto, debe proporcionar un aviso por escrito al Departamento de Relaciones Industriales, a más tardar el 1 de julio de 2016, de la elección del empleador de realizar pagos a su actual y anterior empleados.

El aviso “debe incluir el nombre legal y la dirección del empleador y debe enviarse por correo o entregarse al Director de Relaciones Industriales, a la atención de: Sección de tarifa por pieza, 226.2 Aviso de elección, 1515 Clay Street, 17th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612”.

El Departamento proporcionó un formulario en línea simple que fue utilizado por los empleadores para este propósito.

El Departamento publicará en su sitio web una lista de los empleadores que han proporcionado el aviso requerido o copias de los avisos reales, y estos materiales permanecerán publicados hasta el 31 de marzo de 2017.

(Consulte el Código Laboral §226.2 (b) (3).)

P. ¿Es posible extender el plazo para notificar al Departamento de Relaciones Industriales?

R. El estatuto estableció como fecha límite el 1 de julio de 2016. Una orden judicial extendió temporalmente la fecha límite hasta el 28 de julio de 2016, pero se denegó una solicitud para una extensión adicional. Los empleadores que no enviaron un aviso antes del 28 de julio de 2016 ya no tienen la opción de proporcionar este aviso.

P. ¿Qué tipo de registros tiene que proporcionar el empleador con respecto a los pagos que se realizan a los empleados con el fin de obtener la defensa afirmativa?

A. Cuando un empleador elige hacer pagos a empleados actuales y anteriores de conformidad con la subdivisión (b) del estatuto, el empleador debe proporcionar al empleado, junto con el pago, una declaración que, en términos generales, explique que el pago se realiza de conformidad con este estatuto, explica cuál de las fórmulas se utilizó para determinar el pago (es decir, si se trataba de sumas reales adeudadas o de la opción del 4%) y explica los cálculos que se realizaron para determinar el pago total.

Específicamente:

Si el pago se basa en la opción de “sumas reales adeudadas”, el empleado debe recibir “un estado de cuenta, hoja de cálculo, lista o documento similar que indique, para cada período de pago por el cual se incluyó la compensación en el pago, el total de horas de descanso y períodos de recuperación y otro tiempo no productivo del empleado, las tasas de compensación por ese tiempo y los salarios brutos pagados por ese tiempo “.
Si el pago se basa en la opción “4%”, el empleado debe recibir “un estado de cuenta, hoja de cálculo, listado o documento similar que muestre, por cada período de pago durante el cual el empleado tuvo ganancias durante el período desde el 1 de julio de 2012 , hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2015, inclusive, el salario bruto del empleado y cualquier monto ya pagado al empleado, separado de la remuneración a destajo, por períodos de descanso y recuperación y otro tiempo no productivo ”.
Ambos tipos de declaraciones deben mostrar “los cálculos que se realizaron para determinar el pago total realizado”.

Tenga en cuenta que, según la opción del 4%, un empleador solo está obligado a pagar a un empleado una cantidad “igual al 4 por ciento de los ingresos brutos de ese empleado en los períodos de pago en los que el trabajo se realizó a destajo desde el 1 de julio de 2012 hasta 31 de diciembre de 2015, inclusive, menos los montos ya pagados a dicho empleado, separados de la remuneración a destajo, por los períodos de descanso y recuperación y otros tiempos improductivos durante el mismo tiempo,. . . . ” En otras palabras, el 4% solo se aplica a los períodos de pago en los que se realizó algún trabajo a destajo. Sin embargo, para mostrarle al empleado cómo se determinó el monto del pago, la subdivisión (b) (5) (D) requiere una declaración o documento similar que incluya todos los períodos de pago por los cuales el empleado tuvo ganancias durante el 1 de julio de 2012. al 31 de diciembre de 2015 período de tiempo. Esto sirve para mostrarle al empleado, si es relevante, que puede haber períodos de pago en los que él o ella no tuvo ingresos a destajo y que, por lo tanto, el cálculo del 4% no se aplicó a esos períodos de pago. El propósito de la declaración requerida por esta disposición del estatuto es simplemente mostrarle al empleado cómo se calculó el pago en términos de su propio historial de ganancias.

Además, la subdivisión (d) (3) del estatuto requiere que los empleadores conserven “todos los registros de horas trabajadas, cálculos de horas trabajadas y registros de pagos hechos a los empleados y al Comisionado Laboral de conformidad con la subdivisión (b) y esta subdivisión, hasta el 16 de diciembre de 2020, y proporcionar los registros relacionados con un empleado a pedido del empleado “.

P. ¿Se requiere que todos los empleadores realicen los pagos descritos en las partes de defensa afirmativa del estatuto (subdivisión (b))?

R. No. Las disposiciones relativas a los pagos a los empleados, con el fin de obtener una defensa afirmativa de ciertos reclamos en un litigio, como se describe en la subdivisión (b) del estatuto, son completamente opcionales. Un empleador no está obligado a realizar los pagos descritos en la subdivisión (b), párrafo (1) si opta por no hacerlo.

P. ¿Qué sucede si un empleador elige no realizar los pagos descritos en la subdivisión (b) del estatuto?

A. Si un empleador elige no hacer los pagos y asumir las otras obligaciones establecidas en la subdivisión (b) del estatuto que se requieren para obtener la defensa afirmativa, los derechos y obligaciones legales del empleador bajo la ley tal como existía antes de enero. 1, 2016 permanecen sin cambios y no se ven afectados por este estatuto.

Los requisitos establecidos en la subdivisión (a) del estatuto entran en vigencia para todos los empleadores el 1 de enero de 2016.

P. ¿Se excluyen ciertos tipos de reclamos y casos de las disposiciones de defensa afirmativa en la subdivisión (b) del estatuto?

A. Sí. En términos generales, las disposiciones de defensa afirmativa del estatuto no se aplican a los casos en los que hubo una sentencia definitiva antes de la fecha de vigencia del estatuto, casos que habían estado pendientes y en litigio por un período sustancial antes de la vigencia. fecha del estatuto (es decir, casos presentados antes del 1 de marzo de 2014, con algunas especificaciones adicionales como se establece en el estatuto, que probablemente estén muy avanzados en el proceso de litigio) y casos que alegan un tipo específico de robo de salario.

Las disposiciones también son inaplicables a cualquier reclamo que alegue que “no se informó a los empleados de su derecho a tomar descansos o descansos para recuperarse, que no se dispuso de descansos y descansos para recuperarse, o que se desalentó a los empleados o se les impidió tomar dichos descansos”. (§226.2 (g) (3).) En otras palabras, las disposiciones de defensa afirmativa no se aplican a las reclamaciones de que un empleador no autorizó ni permitió a los empleados tomar períodos de descanso, a diferencia de las reclamaciones que alegan la falta de compensación por dichos períodos. .

Por último, las disposiciones de defensa afirmativa no se aplican a los empleadores que son concesionarios de automóviles nuevos según se define en la sección 426 del Código de vehículos.

P. ¿Cómo se supervisan y hacen cumplir los requisitos de pago atrasado?

R. Según los términos del estatuto, el empleador tiene una defensa afirmativa para ciertos reclamos si el empleador cumple con “todas” las obligaciones establecidas en el estatuto. El Departamento de Relaciones Industriales no está autorizado para supervisar o supervisar estos pagos y no emitirá ninguna aprobación o certificación de que un empleador haya seguido o no el proceso correctamente. Si el empleador cumplió con los requisitos para la defensa afirmativa puede surgir en cualquier disputa sobre compensación a destajo, ya sea en un litigio o en el contexto de un reclamo salarial. En el caso de una disputa de este tipo, dependerá de la persona que escuche la disputa (es decir, el juez, el oficial de audiencia o el árbitro) decidir si el empleador cumplió con todas las obligaciones establecidas en el estatuto para obtener la defensa afirmativa en ese caso particular.

Volver arriba

Calcular y realizar pagos atrasados ​​a empleados y ex empleados a los efectos de la defensa afirmativa
P. ¿A qué se aplica la opción del 4% (en la sección 226.2 (b) (1) (B) del Código Laboral)?

R. El cálculo del 4% se aplica a todos y cada uno de los períodos de pago, entre el 1 de julio de 2012 y el 31 de diciembre de 2015, en los que una parte del trabajo del empleado se compensó a destajo (incluso si se pagó el pago a destajo). además de una tarifa por hora). Si un empleado tuvo períodos de pago sin ingresos a destajo (incluidos los períodos de nómina en los que fue compensado únicamente por horas o recibió solo el pago de vacaciones), esos períodos de pago no se incluyen en el cálculo. Sin embargo, todas las demás semanas deben incluirse en el cálculo, y el cálculo del 4% se aplica a la totalidad de los ingresos brutos del empleado en cada uno de esos períodos de pago.

P. ¿Qué es el “interés acumulado calculado de acuerdo con la subdivisión (c) de la Sección 98.1 del [Código Laboral]”? ¿Cómo se calcula ese interés?

A. La sección 98.1 (c) del Código Laboral establece que se acumularán intereses sobre todos los salarios impagos, a partir de la fecha de vencimiento y pago de los salarios, a la tasa especificada en la subdivisión (b) de la sección 3289 del Código Civil. La tasa especificada en la sección del Código Civil 3289 (b) es diez por ciento de interés simple anual.

La “fecha de vencimiento y pago de los salarios” se refiere al día de pago cuando los salarios originalmente venceban, y para los propósitos de la sección 226.2 del Código Laboral, subdivisión (b), corresponde a cada día de pago que cubre el trabajo dentro del período de pago retroactivo desde el 1 de julio de 2012 hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2015. Se requiere un cálculo de intereses diferente para cada período de nómina por el cual se adeuda algún salario, que se extiende desde ese día de pago hasta la fecha de pago. Por lo tanto, asumiendo que el empleador realizó estos pagos en julio de 2016, exactamente cuatro años después del primer día de pago del período, requeriría cuatro años de interés (4 años multiplicado por 10% = 40%) sobre los salarios adicionales adeudados por ese primer período de pago. en julio de 2012; y luego 3 años y cuantas semanas sean intereses sobre los salarios adeudados para el siguiente día de pago; etc .; hasta llegar a fines de diciembre de 2015, para lo cual se habría requerido alrededor del 5% de interés (10% anual multiplicado por seis meses = 5%).

P. ¿Qué esfuerzos debe realizar un empleador para localizar a ex empleados? ¿Qué se entiende por “debida diligencia”?

A. La sección 226.2 del Código Laboral no define lo que constituye la “debida diligencia”, aparte de indicar que incluye, pero no se limita a, “el uso de servicios de localización de personas”. (Consulte la sección 226.2 del Código Laboral, subdivisión (d) (1).) Hay una variedad de servicios de localización de personas disponibles en Internet a través de los cuales alguien puede buscar un nombre en un intento de localizar una dirección actual. Muchos de estos servicios ofrecen un pase de un mes, por una pequeña tarifa, que permite un número ilimitado de búsquedas. Dada la referencia del estatuto al uso de servicios de localización de personas, la “debida diligencia” por parte de un empleador probablemente requeriría el uso de uno de estos servicios para al menos una búsqueda por empleado para quien el empleador no tiene una dirección actual.

Más allá de este requisito específico, lo que constituye la “debida diligencia” dependería de las circunstancias. En general, el concepto de diligencia debida incorpora elementos tanto de razonabilidad (¿qué es razonable dadas las circunstancias?) Y de buena fe (¿se hizo un esfuerzo genuino?). Como tal, los factores relevantes incluirían el monto del pago que se hace a un empleado y la naturaleza y extensión de la información que el empleador tiene sobre ese empleado. Por ejemplo, si el empleador no tiene la información de contacto actual de un ex empleado, pero continúa empleando al hermano del ex empleado, la “debida diligencia” podría requerir que el empleador le pregunte al hermano si tiene una dirección postal actual del ex empleado. Si, por otro lado, el empleador no tiene la dirección actual de un ex empleado, la búsqueda del localizador de personas no tiene éxito porque el ex empleado tiene un nombre muy común y el empleador no tiene otra información directa sobre cómo ubicar a esa persona. , entonces el empleador puede haber hecho su “debida diligencia” en cuanto a ese empleado en particular.

Otra forma de abordar esta pregunta es ponerse en el lugar de alguien que ha abandonado el área pero ahora un antiguo empleador le debe algo de dinero: ¿qué esfuerzos razonablemente esperaría que hiciera el empleador para encontrarlo y asegurarse de que le paguen? ?

P. ¿Cuándo debe un empleador hacer su debida diligencia y cómo debe manejar una situación en la que se ha enviado un cheque a un ex empleado pero no se ha cobrado ni devuelto por correo?

R. Un empleador puede y debe hacer su diligencia debida tan pronto como sea posible para encontrar o confirmar las direcciones de los ex empleados. Si hay alguna duda sobre si un cheque sin cobrar llegó a su destinatario previsto, el empleador puede cancelar ese cheque y volver a emitir otro si el empleador cree que ahora tiene una mejor dirección. Probablemente también valga la pena el gasto de enviar estos cheques (y los estados de cuenta adjuntos) por correo certificado, con acuse de recibo, para que el empleador tenga un registro de que se entregó al destinatario previsto. Si el empleador ha hecho un esfuerzo diligente para localizar una buena dirección, pero el cheque aún no se pudo entregar, entonces el pago de ese empleado puede ser redirigido al Fondo de Salarios No Pagados. Por otro lado, si no hay duda real de que el pago (y el estado de cuenta) se haya entregado realmente al empleado que tiene derecho a recibirlos, entonces el empleador ha hecho su parte, incluso si el cheque no se cobra de inmediato.

P. ¿Es posible extender el plazo para realizar pagos atrasados ​​a ex empleados? ¿Cómo puede un empleador hacer su “debida diligencia” con los cheques que se devuelven después de la fecha límite del 15 de diciembre y aún así entregar los fondos impagos al Comisionado Laboral antes de esa fecha límite?

R. La fecha límite del 15 de diciembre está en el estatuto y no se puede cambiar. En realidad, el estatuto ordena a los empleadores que comiencen a realizar pagos “tan pronto como sea razonablemente posible” y que completen esos pagos “a más tardar el 15 de diciembre de 2016”. Con eso en mente, no es necesario esperar hasta el 15 de diciembre antes de realizar la diligencia debida y realizar los pagos. Los empleadores primero deben hacer su mejor esfuerzo para localizar una buena dirección (como se discutió en las respuestas anteriores a las preguntas de “diligencia debida”) antes de enviar un pago a un ex empleado. Enviar el pago a esa dirección por correo certificado, con acuse de recibo solicitado, proporcionará la confirmación de que fue entregado a la persona prevista. Luego, una vez que el empleador ha confirmado qué empleados recibieron sus pagos, el empleador puede determinar qué ex empleados no fueron ubicados con éxito y redirigir sus pagos al Fondo de salarios no pagados.

P. ¿Cómo realiza un empleador los pagos al Comisionado Laboral “de conformidad con la Sección 96.7 del [Código Laboral]” para los ex empleados que no pudieron ser localizados?

A. Los empleadores que han elegido participar en las disposiciones de defensa afirmativa del estatuto deben, entre otras obligaciones, hacer “pagos a más tardar el 15 de diciembre de 2016, a cada empleado a quien se le adeuda el salario, o Comisionado de conformidad con la Sección 96.7 para cualquier empleado a quien el empleador no pueda localizar “. (Sección 226.2 (b) (4) del Código Laboral [énfasis agregado]). La sección 96.7 del Código Laboral se refiere al Fondo de Salarios No Pagados de Relaciones Laborales.

Los empleadores deben actuar con la debida diligencia para rastrear y pagar a los ex empleados. Si no tiene éxito, el dinero adeudado a los empleados que no pueden ser localizados debe ingresarse en el Fondo de salarios no pagados. Este pago debe ir acompañado de una tarifa administrativa adicional equivalente a la mitad del uno por ciento de los “pagos totales realizados” o $ 2,500, lo que sea menor.

Instrucciones para realizar pagos al Fondo de salario impago:

Objetos requeridos:

  1. Un estado de cuenta en formato impreso y electrónico * que enumera la siguiente información para cada empleado cubierto por el pago:

Nombre
Importe neto pagadero al empleado después de la retención **
Si está disponible, la última dirección conocida del empleado y el número de seguro social

  1. Un cheque por el total de todos los montos ingresados ​​al Fondo en ese momento para los empleados que no pudieron ser localizados.

Haga este cheque pagadero a:
RELACIONES INDUSTRIALES FONDO DE SALARIOS NO PAGADOS

  1. Un segundo cheque equivalente a la mitad del 1% (.005) de la cantidad en el artículo 2 o $ 2500.00, lo que sea menor.

Haga este cheque pagadero a:
FONDO DE CUMPLIMIENTO Y CUMPLIMIENTO LABORAL

Envíe todos estos artículos a más tardar el 15 de diciembre de 2016 a la siguiente dirección.

Departamento de Relaciones Industriales
Aplicación AB 1513
1515 Clay St., piso 17
Oakland, CA 94612

Recomendamos enviar todo por correo certificado, con acuse de recibo, para confirmar la entrega y recepción a tiempo.

  • Proporcionar estado de cuenta al fondo de salarios no pagados en formato electrónico

Se alienta a los empleadores a utilizar el Formulario 40 al informar los pagos de salarios al Fondo de salarios no pagados. Se debe colocar una copia electrónica del Formulario 40 u otra declaración en un CD o memoria USB protegido con contraseña que se envía junto con el pago físico. (Incluya la información de contacto en la carta de presentación, para que el personal del Comisionado Laboral pueda comunicarse con usted para obtener la contraseña). De lo contrario, la información puede enviarse por correo electrónico a 3rdPartySettlements-UWF&AB1513@dir.ca.gov. Si se envía por correo electrónico, la transmisión debe estar cifrada y el remitente también deberá proporcionar suficiente información en el mensaje de correo electrónico para asociar la transmisión con los elementos que llegan por correo postal.

** Nota sobre impuestos sobre la nómina y retenciones:

Los pagos que se realizarán a los empleados y ex empleados bajo la sección 226.2 del Código Laboral tienen la naturaleza de salarios atrasados ​​o salarios suplementarios y están sujetos a impuestos sobre la nómina, retención de impuestos y declaración de impuestos. Esto es cierto tanto para los pagos hechos directamente a los empleados actuales y anteriores que están ubicados, como para los ex empleados que no pudieron ser ubicados y cuyo pago se hará al Fondo de Salarios No Pagados. Si un empleador está haciendo un pago al Fondo de salario no pagado para un ex empleado que no pudo ser localizado, el empleador debe realizar todas las retenciones de impuestos, el pago de impuestos y la declaración de impuestos para ese pago, y pagar solo el monto neto adeudado al empleado en el Fondo de salarios impagos.

Si los empleadores tienen preguntas sobre cómo manejar adecuadamente los impuestos sobre la nómina, la retención y la declaración de estos pagos, pueden comunicarse con el Centro de Asistencia al Contribuyente del EDD al 1-888-745-3886.

Finalmente, se recuerda a los empleadores su obligación bajo la subdivisión (d) (3) de la Sección 226.2 de “conservar todos los registros de horas trabajadas, cálculos de horas trabajadas y registros de pagos hechos a los empleados y al Comisionado Laboral … hasta el 16 de diciembre , 2020, y proporcionar los registros relacionados con un empleado a pedido del empleado “.

P. ¿Qué sucede si un empleador envió cheques a ex empleados antes de la fecha límite, pero esos cheques nunca se cobraron?

R. Si los cheques ya no son negociables o siguen sin cobrar después de que haya transcurrido un tiempo razonable, los empleadores pueden transferir los pagos pendientes al Fondo de salario impago. Se anima a los empleadores a seguir las instrucciones enumeradas anteriormente al entregar estos pagos, pero pueden llevar los pagos a cualquier oficina del Comisionado Laboral.

Reclamaciones de los empleados sobre la compensación a destajo
P. ¿Cómo reclama un empleado los fondos que se enviaron al Fondo de salario impago?

A los empleados elegibles para el pago atrasado bajo AB 1513 se les puede haber entregado sus pagos al Fondo de Salarios No Pagados del Comisionado Laboral. Los empleados que crean que su pago puede haberse transferido al Fondo de salarios no pagados deben usar este formulario para solicitar el pago. Por favor complete el formulario y envíelo por correo a la dirección a continuación o llévelo a cualquier oficina local del Comisionado Laboral.

Departamento de Relaciones Industriales
Aplicación AB 1513
Unidad de caja centralizada
2031 Howe Avenue, Suite 100
Sacramento, CA 95825

P. ¿Qué puede hacer un empleado si un empleador viola los requisitos de pago por pieza?

R. Un empleado al que no se le haya pagado la compensación debida en virtud de la sección 226.2 del Código Laboral o cualquier otra ley de salarios y horas puede presentar un reclamo legal para recuperar los salarios adeudados y los daños y sanciones posiblemente relacionados. En términos generales, hay tres formas de presentar tal reclamo: a través del Comisionado Laboral, a través de un sistema alternativo de resolución de disputas como el arbitraje (si es requerido o permitido por un contrato de trabajo), o mediante una demanda en los tribunales. Los empleados que persiguen la primera opción pueden presentar un reclamo de salario individual ante la Unidad de Adjudicación de Reclamos de Salarios del Comisionado Laboral, o pueden presentar un Informe de Violación de la Ley Laboral ante la Oficina de Aplicación de Campo del Comisionado Laboral, que no persigue reclamos individuales, pero puede investigar y citar al empleador. Más información sobre reclamos salariales y derechos de los empleados en general está disponible en el sitio web del Comisionado Laboral o en cualquiera de las oficinas locales del Comisionado Laboral.

2 thoughts on “Attention WICR Piece Rate Workers, Know Your Rights On Compensation – Former Employees May Be Eligible For Back Wages Too! Atención, trabajadores a destajo de WICR, conozca sus derechos sobre la compensación – Los ex empleados también pueden ser elegibles para salarios atrasados!”

  1. You forgot to add medical expenses
    WICR has workers compensation insurance
    But if any of the documented and undocumented employees get hurt, WICR will take it from your paycheck.

    I have proof of it. Jagger is a citizen of the United States and got hurt on a project named Master series in Huntington Beach
    I have an e-mail that this company sent to my wife
    explaining why they took the money of my paychecks

    I still have the email and records of my paychecks were the medical expenses got deducted.

    This company will take the milk out your kids mouth.
    The owner is one of the most Greedy people that I have meet my entire life.
    He can’t afford the new wife!

    Waterproof sales experience hahaha.

    Like

  2. We need to mention as well that
    I got a knee injury (still)
    WICR scheduled a doctor’s visit.
    I went, and the doctor examined my leg and suggested that I should see a knee doctor.
    But WICR contacted him and asked him to get rid of my file.
    and forget about it

    2 year after I went back to see the same doctor and I asked for my personal records hi asked my not to do anything against him for throwing my file away
    This is his explanation
    ( David krubinsky called me the same day and asked me the type of injury that you have.
    I told him the medical care that you need at that time
    But David instead asked my to forget about you! and such file should be trashed.

    Hope to hear from the state.
    Somebody needs to investigate them!

    Like

Tell Us Your Opinion!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s